5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today

5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today

Did you know what did early civilizations use for bridges? Here’s a fact!

Early Greek and Roman civilizations used things like stones and logs to make their bridges. Mathematicians in early Greek and Roman civilizations worked out the problem of bridging the gap between the land and building bridges strong enough to carry massive amounts of weight.
StructureYou might be wondering why we shared that knowledge with you. Because, today we’ll be giving you the 5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today.

#5 Shaharah Bridge
5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today-Shaharah Bridge

Or “Bridge of Sighs” (not the one in Venice). Found in Yemen and built in the 17th century, Shaharah Bridge is a path that spans a 200-meter-deep (650 ft) canyon in order to connect two mountains, Jabal al Emir and Jabal al Faish. The bridge was made to better connect the villages on both mountains to save time and effort. These days, Shaharah Bridge is a major tourist attraction, and the locals still receives its intended use as a functioning bridge.

#4 Ponte Fabricio
5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today-Ponte Fabricio

From Rome and built in 62 B.C. by L. Fabricius curator viarum, the bridge is almost unchanged, and still serves thousands of Romans today. It links the island to the shore below the Capitoline, on the east bank. This is the oldest Roman bridge to have survived in the city, and is still in use by pedestrians. In the Middle Ages, it was called “Pons Judeurum” (Jewish bridge) because of the proximity of the Ghetto.

#3 Caravan Bridge
5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today-Caravan Bridge

Built in 850 B.C., the bridge is 2,861 years old and has reportedly been crossed by the likes of Homer and Saint Paul. The arched stone slab straddling the River Meles in Izmir, Turkey, extends only 42-and-a half feet, and is about as simple as they come. As impressive as some of the other bridges on this list are, it’s hard to imagine they’ll last even half that long.

#2 Ponte Sant’Angelo
5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today-Ponte Sant’Angelo

Ordered to be constructed by Emperor Hadrian in A.D. 136, and translated as “Bridge of the Holy Angel,” it is still one of the most famous bridges in Rome. The goal of the bridge was to connect the whole of Rome to his own mausoleum, the Castel Sant’Angelo (Castle of the Holy Angel). Wondering about the name? The angel was said to have appeared in 590 B.C. on top of the same building and had miraculously ended the plague in Rome

#1 Arkadiko Bridge
5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today-Arkadiko Bridge

The oldest-surviving arch bridge still in use. It’s believed to have been built during the Greek Bronze Age, around 1300–1200 B.C., meaning it has gone through a lot to make it to today. It acted as part of a military road system between the cities Tiryns and Epidaurus back in Mycenaean times. It has a wider berth than a normal footbridge, with a road width of around 2.5 meters (8 ft). Historians believe that this additional width was designed so that the bridge could handle chariots.

Pro Tip: If you’re planning to visit the 5 Bridges by Ancients That are Still in Use Today, make sure to do your research first; also try looking to book your flights using online travel agencies as they tend to, on average, reduce airfare costs by about 43%, a few good ones being Flighthub.com, Travelocity.com, JustFly.com or Expedia.com.

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Comments 1

  1. Good post however , I was wondering if you could write a litte more
    on this topic? I’d be very grateful if you could
    elaborate a little bit more. Kudos!

     

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